Action 7.3

Clinicians use organisational processes from the Partnering with Consumers Standard when providing safe blood management to:

a. Actively involve patients in their own care

b. Meet the patient’s information needs

c. Share decision-making

Intent

Patients and carers are informed about patient blood management principles, the risks and benefits of using blood and blood products, and all treatment options.

Reflective questions

What processes from the Partnering with Consumers Standard do clinicians use to involve patients in planning and making decisions about safe blood management?

How does the health service organisation collect feedback from patients about information provided on safe blood management?

How does the health service organisation involve patients in decisions about their care and confirm their consent to treatment?

Key tasks

  • Review strategies in the Partnering with Consumers Standard to inform the implementation of actions in the Blood Management Standard
  • Provide information to patients about patient blood management principles, the risks and benefits of using blood and blood products, and all treatment options, that is tailored to their specific needs and level of health literacy.

Strategies for improvement

Hospitals

The Partnering with Consumers Standard has specific actions (Actions 2.3–2.10) relating to health service organisations’ processes for involving patients in their own care, shared decision making, informed consent and effective communication.

Provide information to patients and carers about optimising their own blood, PBM strategies, and the potential need for blood and blood products, including all treatment options, risks and benefits. Provide this in a format that can be understood and is meaningful, and ensure that patients are given the opportunity to ask questions. Ensure that the information is current, and that clinicians have ready access to it.

Information on blood management should suit different health literacy levels, including simpler and more complex information resources, so that clinicians have access to the most appropriate information for an individual patient. Written information and diagrams may be appropriate in certain circumstances; in others, information could be provided online.

Where local information or resources are developed, involve patients and carers in developing these resources (see Action 2.9).

Seek feedback from patients about the information provided using surveys or informal discussions, and make changes to ensure that it is understood and meaningful.

Ensure that organisation-wide informed consent processes (see Action 2.4) include consideration of issues relating to consent for transfusions.

Day Procedure Services

Applicability of actions

The actions in the Blood Management Standard will not be applicable for day procedure services that do not use blood or blood products. These services should provide evidence that they do not use, receive, store, collect or transport the blood or blood products governed under this standard.

Services using blood or blood products should refer to the information provided for hospitals for blood management.

MPS & Small Hospitals

The Partnering with Consumers Standard has specific actions (Actions 2.3–2.10) relating to health service organisations’ processes for involving patients in their own care, shared decision making, informed consent and effective communication.

Provide information to patients and carers about optimising their own blood, PBM strategies, and the potential need for blood and blood products, including all treatment options, risks and benefits. Provide this in a format that can be understood and is meaningful, and ensure that patients are given the opportunity to ask questions. Ensure that the information is current, and that clinicians have ready access to it.

Information on blood management should suit different health literacy levels, including simpler and more complex information resources, so that clinicians have access to the most appropriate information for an individual patient. Written information and diagrams may be appropriate in certain circumstances; in others, information could be provided online.

Seek feedback from patients about the information provided using surveys or informal discussions, and make changes to ensure that it is understood and meaningful.

Ensure that organisation-wide informed consent processes (see Action 2.4) include consideration of issues relating to consent for transfusions.

Last updated 30th May, 2018 at 01:10am
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