Health service organisations implementing strategies for safe communication need to consider the role of family members in communicating with children; the widely varied levels of communication skills and understanding of children; and the involvement of children and their family at transitions of care.

Why does this standard need special consideration by health service organisations that provide care for children?

Health service organisations implementing strategies for safe communication need to consider:

  • The role of family members in communicating with children
  • The widely varied levels of communication skills and understanding of children
  • The involvement of children and their family at transitions of care.60
Last updated 20th December, 2018 at 09:06pm
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References

60. Iedema R, Manidis M. Patient–clinician communication: an overview of relevant research and policy literatures. Sydney: Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, UTS Centre for Health Communication; 2013 (accessed Dec 2017).

61. McArthur A, Peters MD, Munn Z, Chu WH. Safe management of expressed breast milk (EBM). Sydney: Sax Institute; 2015 (accessed Apr 2016).

62. Oduyebo I, Lehmann C, Pollack C, Durkin N, Miller J, Mandell S, et al. Association of self-reported hospital discharge handoffs with 30-day readmissions. JAMA Intern Med 2013;173(8):624–9.

63. Hansen L, Strater A, Smith L, Lee J, Press R, Ward N, et al. Hospital discharge documentation and risk of rehospitalisation. BMJ Qual Saf 2011;20(9):773–8.

64. Gilbert A, Patel B, Morrow M, Williams M, Roberts M, Gilbert A. Providing community-based health practitioners with timely and accurate discharge medicines information. BMC Health Serv Res 2012;12:453.